Inspect your furnace thermostat by first making sure that it’s turned on. Also, ensure that the thermostat switch is turned to “heat” and not “cool”. If your furnace will still not start with the thermostat on, try adjusting the temperature settings to a few degrees higher. Inspect any visible wires for breaks or splits, and make sure your thermostat batteries are not dead. Do not touch any open wires; contact a professional.

You can help prevent issues with your system by scheduling routine maintenance on your furnace every year. During a maintenance visit, our technician will inspect and clean your furnace to help the system to run more smoothly and efficiently for the coming winter. You can have it done any time, but the maintenance is typically performed in the fall. Ask about our planned service agreement program!

With our furnace service, your burners will be pulled and cleaned. To ensure the best possible efficiency, we can adjust your heat-off delay. You can also expect a combustion analysis performed by a professionally certified HVAC technician. With a proper combustion analysis, we’ll be able to tell you if your furnace is operating at maximum efficiency and keep you safe.
Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
Sky Heating & Air Conditioning answers any comfort challenge with straightforward, satisfying solutions. We get rid of the need for labor-intensive renovation. We don’t tear down walls or ceilings, steal precious closet space for the installation of ductwork, or cause mess or damage. With the installation of a ductless HVAC system, we answer your temperature control requirements with wonderful simplicity.
We asked This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey to show us the proper steps that a service professional would follow for an oil-burning forced-air furnace; the basics on a gas system are similar. In both, fuel is mixed with air and ignited, heating a sealed chamber. Fresh, filtered air then blows across the outside of the hot chamber and into the heating ducts. (Homes with radiators have boilers instead of furnaces. These heat water instead of air, but the annual checkup is similar.) In all, the dangerous exhaust from the combustion chamber is vented out a flue or chimney.

Furnace Repair Company CO

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