Though forced-air furnaces are normally quite reliable, they can break down. To avoid break downs, it pays to know how to take care of your furnace and fix it when something goes wrong. Inevitably, a furnace stops working when you need it most. Consequently, fixing becomes urgent very quickly. The following instructions will help. With a little do-it-yourself experience and the proper guidance, you can troubleshoot and repair a variety of furnace problems yourself.
To keep your furnace in good working order it’s important to have it regularly cleaned. The national average furnace cleaning cost ranges from $60 to $80, though prices can vary greatly based on where you live in the country and what your furnace maintenance includes. An HVAC company may have different rates for different levels of furnace maintenance. For example,one company may offer general furnace maintenance for $79 and advanced maintenance for $138. Another company may offer a 38-point maintenance check for $89 and a 64-point maintenance check for $178. According to Energy.gov, a standard furnace cleaning and maintenance visit can include:
"LIFESAVER! Came right out to our home to save us from the heat. I called around 11 and they sent someone by the afternoon 1:30. Carlos fixed our AC on the spot! Very professional and knew what the issues were and fixed them all as fast as possible! Otherwise we would all be toast in this Texas Summer HEat. Thank you Carlos with Ruben's AC! Excellent service"
Put simply, any home that uses air pushed through ductwork for heating purposes takes advantage of forced air heating. In other words, this term refers not to your furnace, but to the delivery method of the heat throughout your home. Forced air heating is possible with electric or gas furnaces, or a heat pump. Any issues with this delivery system that aren't directly related to the furnace likely have to do with the duct work, which costs between $35 and $55 per linear square foot to repair, or the air handling unit.
When a furnace maintenance is performed a combustion analysis should be performed to identify any problems that couldn't be found by a visual inspection. You want to know what the Carbon monoxide level your furnace is producing as well as the oxygen/CO2 levels and stack temperate. The analyzer will also give you a calculated efficiency rating with the information the analyzer receives. You should have >100ppm of Carbon monoxide output during normal operation of your gas furnace. When you have higher numbers or CO numbers increasing during operation their is a problem with the furnace the technician should then find the cause of. This is just a brief explanation I'm trying to get across to those who get their furnace maintained and to those who don't! Check to see if anyone in the company has a NCI certification for carbon monoxide/combustion analysis.

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