It’s important to keep your furnace receives regular maintenance to ensure that it’s working properly and efficiently. Routine maintenance can also extend the life of your heating system by several years. Ask about our annual maintenance agreements that cover your plumbing, heating, and cooling systems and save you money. A furnace that has been neglected may be working too hard, which can result in inconsistent air temperatures in your Minneapolis area home. Learn more about the importance of routine maintenance on your HVAC system.
Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.
Call local Petro Home Services today to schedule a natural gas furnace tune-up by a professional technician. Our pros are qualified, experienced, and will perform a complete tune up, so you won’t need to worry that your furnace will heat your home efficiently this coming winter. You’ll also learn about preventative maintenance and furnace service plans, so you’ll be comfortable in your home all winter long.
Richard sets up a combustion analyzer, which calculates furnace efficiency by measuring gasses in the exhaust flue. He makes sure that the burner's air gates are adjusted for the proper ration of fuel to air. "You want the fuel that you've brought to the be burned before it goes up the chimney," Richard says. He also replaces the oil nozzle, which atomizes the fuel just before it ignites, and checks the flame color and shape at the igniter. For either oil or gas, this is a key indicator of stable and complete combustion. In a gas system, this is the time when the burner tubes should be vacuumed clean.

You should never wait for your furnace to break down completely before scheduling professional furnace repair service in Kirkland, WA. The best way to handle any furnace repair needs is to contact a repairman at the first sign of trouble. If you notice a spike in heating costs, your furnace is not heating your home evenly, or it makes strange and unusual sounds, then it’s time to bring in a qualified Kirkland furnace repair technician.

Given the broad price ranges above, it's easy to recognize that the cost of your furnace repair varies drastically based on which parts need attention. As a result, it makes sense to gain a better understanding of the parts that heat your home, and how much they cost to repair. Repairing or replacing your furnace’s blower motor can cost you anywhere between $150 and $450, depending on the extent of the damage. Heat exchanger repair costs can vary greatly, from as little as $100 for a simple fix to as much as $1,200 for a full replacement. Repairing a furnace igniter will only cost you $300 at most, while flame sensor repairs generally fall between $80 to $250. The average cost to repair your Thermostat will range from $108 to $282.
As a Carrier dealer, with a wide variety of products to choose from, we can keep your family healthy and feeling comfortable all year long. We carry a complete line of indoor comfort equipment with innovations that raise the standards of comfort and reliability, including air conditioners, heat pumps, gas furnaces, programmable thermostats, humidifiers, ductless split systems, air cleaners, ultra violet lights, ventilators and zoning products. Let the experts at A. Johnson Heating & Air help you customize a solution that's right for you.
We asked This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey to show us the proper steps that a service professional would follow for an oil-burning forced-air furnace; the basics on a gas system are similar. In both, fuel is mixed with air and ignited, heating a sealed chamber. Fresh, filtered air then blows across the outside of the hot chamber and into the heating ducts. (Homes with radiators have boilers instead of furnaces. These heat water instead of air, but the annual checkup is similar.) In all, the dangerous exhaust from the combustion chamber is vented out a flue or chimney.

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