Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.
Roger! I am so sad to hear of your retirement, but also so grateful for all the episodes you have done. I hope your health comes back to you in full force--and soon--so you can enjoy a fantastic retirement surrounded by friends and family. Your viewers will miss you greatly, but your legacy lives on in all the blooming flowers and budding gardens you've inspired over the years (including in my very own yard). I hope you'll visit the show often; we'll be looking out for you!!Sincerely,FGJ
Finally, don't underestimate the thermostat as a potential reason why your furnace is not working. Everything on the heating unit itself may function perfectly, but your home still will not heat right if the console you use to set the temperature doesn't communicate your input. A faulty thermostat can either be due to the wall unit itself, or the wiring that connects it to your furnace. Average thermostat repair costs are between $108 and $282, including labor. Replacement costs, of course, depend on the thermostat you choose. Visit our thermostat repair cost guide to learn more about this type of issue.
When you change the temperature on your thermostat, or the temperature in your home drops, a signal lets the furnace's igniter know that it's time to turn on. Igniters exist in both hot water boilers and forced air furnaces, replacing pilot lights as the switch your unit needs to kick on. Naturally, this is a core part in making sure it works reliably. When it stops working, your unit will not longer know when to actually heat your home. Fortunately, furnace igniter repair doesn't tend to be a major budget problem, and costs less than $300 on average.

The cost to replace your gas furnace will vary based on the type and size of furnace you select, labor and installation costs, and any repairs your HVAC system may need. Nationally, average HVAC prices for a heating specialist range between $1,800 and $2,500. It’s important to select the right size gas furnace for your heating needs. A furnace that’s too small won’t heat your house properly, while a furnace that’s too large will run inefficiently, cycling on and off and likely breaking down sooner. HVAC specialists calculate your exact heat needs by measuring your home and incorporating variables such as the regional climate and your home’s level of insulation. Retail pricing for gas furnaces can range from $650 up to $3,000 and more. The higher the AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency) rating of the furnace, the more efficient it is at turning fuel into heat and the lower your carbon footprint and utility bill will be. HVAC installation costs are often based on an hourly rate and can range from under $50 to over $100 per hour, depending on the company and the furnace being installed. Higher-end furnaces cost more to install because they require added labor and expertise. For a typical installation, it might take two HVAC installation pros one day or less to remove your old furnace and replace it with a new one.
When your gas furnace isn’t blowing hot air, the issue could be due to a faulty pilot light or broken ignitor. Remove the furnace cover panel and visually inspect whether you can see a flame from the pilot light. A natural gas furnace will be blue and yellow in color, and a propane furnace should have a bluish green flame with a yellow tip. If you can see a flame and it appears normal, the issue could be related to the furnace blower motor or other complex furnace parts. If the flame appears low or non-existent, it’s best to contact an experienced furnace repair company. Remember to never touch any open wires; contact a professional.
Don’t forget, when you’re in the need for 24 HR emergency repair in Akron, Ohio, Jennings is there for you no matter the time of day or night—24 hours a day and 7 days a week. If you have an emergency, please call 330-784-1286 now. If you would like to request service, please fill out and submit the form below and a Jennings associate will be in touch make an appointment.
The chill of winter can be a scary thought when your furnace needs a repair. When the furnace in your home goes on the fritz, you need it fixed right away to keep your family safe and comfortable. Every BGE HOME technician is licensed in their trade and adheres to a stringent in-house certification program that guarantees their knowledge, affirms their commitment to the customer, and ensures excellence in completing every repair with the highest level of quality. Our technicians average 11 years in the HVAC industry, so you can rest assured that the technician who makes your furnace repair is knowledgeable and experienced.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.

When our Denver heating company provides you with maintenance checks before the cold of winter sets in, you will be saving money in several different ways. One of the benefits of a maintenance plan is our technicians will be less likely to have to make repairs throughout the year as long as the system is properly maintained. Our Denver heating company will have your system running at its most efficient, helping to reduce your utility bills each month. An added benefit of a more efficiently running system is the positive environmental effect that it will have.


When a furnace maintenance is performed a combustion analysis should be performed to identify any problems that couldn't be found by a visual inspection. You want to know what the Carbon monoxide level your furnace is producing as well as the oxygen/CO2 levels and stack temperate. The analyzer will also give you a calculated efficiency rating with the information the analyzer receives. You should have >100ppm of Carbon monoxide output during normal operation of your gas furnace. When you have higher numbers or CO numbers increasing during operation their is a problem with the furnace the technician should then find the cause of. This is just a brief explanation I'm trying to get across to those who get their furnace maintained and to those who don't! Check to see if anyone in the company has a NCI certification for carbon monoxide/combustion analysis.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
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